Dr. Felix Petersen

Minerva Post-Doctoral Fellow

Richard Koebner Center for German History
Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Felix Petersen holds a PhD in Political Science from Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, MA in Political Theory from Goethe University Frankfurt, and BA in Political Science from Ruhr-Universität Bochum. He taught at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin and Goethe-University Frankfurt. In 2016 and 2017, Felix was a visiting researcher at Princeton University. Before joining the Hebrew University, he worked as a researcher in the department for Comparative Politics and Political Systems of Eastern Europe at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin. He was researcher in the projects “The Influence of Constitutional Courts on the Process of Transformation” (BMBF) and “Research Lab: Constitutional Politics in Turkey I & II” (Mercator). His primary research and teaching areas are political theory, political history, constitutional politics, theories of democracy and autocracy, contentious politics, social constructionism, the Weimar Republic, German politics.

Selected Publications

Petersen, F. & Z. Yanasmayan (Eds.).
The failure of popular constitution making in Turkey: regressing towards constitutional autocracy. Cambridge University Press. [Forthcoming 2019]

Petersen, F., S. von Steinsdorff, E. Göztepe & M. Abad Andrade. The Constitutional Court of Turkey: Judicial politics between authoritarianism and democracy. Nomos. [Forthcoming 2019]

Petersen, F. (2018).
Judicial review and social construction: The case of the Turkish Constitutional Court. Research and Policy on Turkey, 3(1), 18-39.

Petersen, F., &  Z. Yanasmayan (2017).
The final trick? Separation of powers, checks and balances, and the recomposition of the Turkish State [Blog post]. Retrieved from https://verfassungsblog.de/the-final-trick-separation-of-powers-checks-and-balances-and-the-recomposition-of-the-turkish-state/ .

Petersen, F. & S. Stein (2015).
Protest and its suppression in the occupied Palestinian territories and in Turkey. J. of Intern. Law of Peace and Armed Conflict, 28(1), 4-12.